Dream mystery shopping jobs

When you first start out working as a mystery shopper, you're probably not going to land your dream job.

When you first start out working as a mystery shopper, you're probably not going to land your dream job. You'll likely start out small with retail stores and small restaurants. Over time you'll be able to build up some experience and use that experience to get bigger and better jobs. The dream mystery jobs are hard to get, but if you're persistent, you might, eventually, land the mystery shopping gig of your dreams. 

How to land the good mystery shopping jobs
It's never easy to land the good jobs, but if you're a consistent hard worker, at some point it is likely that you'll get the job you've been searching for. In order to land that job, you need to be flexible. Be ready to take the job of your dreams even if it's at a busy time of the month or year. You might have to work holidays or on a weekend you already have something planned. Being open and flexible will allow you to take the good jobs when you find out about them. It helps if you always act professional too. Although mystery shopping might not be a full-time commitment, it's important to treat it as if it were. The more professional you are, the more likely you'll be to land the mystery shopping job you want.

Beware of scams
The mystery shopping industry is one that is often targeted by scammers. Scammers consistently post mystery shopping jobs that are often the jobs shoppers dream of. Some scams are so elaborate that you might not be able to tell the difference between it and legitimate opportunities upon first look, but it's important to do your research and make sure the job is real. Promises that seem too good to be true or jobs not posted on market research or merchandising companies should be avoided. Check out the company website and check out some mystery shopping forums to find out what other mystery shoppers are saying about the company. No matter how good the job seems, never wire money, accept a check or provide bank information to someone or some company you aren't sure of. It's always better to be safe than sorry.