Casinos need better customer satisfaction measurements

Customer surveys are no longer a reliable means for determining the success of a casino, according to Robinson & Associates, guest service consulting firm to the global gambling industry.

Customer surveys are no longer a reliable means for determining the success of a casino, according to Robinson & Associates, guest service consulting firm to the global gambling industry. The company recently published a white paper that found customer satisfaction and loyalty surveys do not indicate the profitability and revenue of a casino.

"Many casinos conduct research to determine if they are on the right track for future growth, but they don't realize they are using the wrong approach," says Martin R. Baird, chief executive officer of the company. "If they think customer satisfaction and customer loyalty surveys will give them the data they need, they are wrong."

Baird explains that customers are fickle and may say they had a positive experience, but then stop patronizing a business anyway. Satisfaction and loyalty are trumped by customer advocacy. An advocate is a patron who will put their reputation on the line to recommend the business to family and friends. A simple survey may not be able to evaluate that.

Still, some casinos are banking on the success of programs that are designed to encourage customer loyalty and increase satisfaction. MotorCity Casino Hotel in Detroit recently announced a new program that allows participants to put rewards points toward the lease or purchase of a new Chrysler, GM or Ford vehicle.