Consumers content with pay-TV subscriptions

It may not come as a surprise to note that Americans are relying less and less on over-the-air TV signals to watch television, given that the medium is an increasingly dated and out-competed technology.

It may not come as a surprise to note that Americans are relying less and less on over-the-air TV signals to watch television, given that the medium is an increasingly dated and out-competed technology, but those are the findings of a survey released this week by the Consumer Electronics Association.

According to the report, only 8 percent of all households with TVs in the U.S. rely on over-the-air signals for TV programming, continuing a steady decline that has been transpiring since 2005.

"Over-the-air TV was once the defining distribution platform," said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the CEA. "But using huge swaths of wireless spectrum to deliver TV to homes no longer makes economic sense. Congress should pass legislation to allow for incentive auctions so free market dynamics can find the best purposes for underused broadcast spectrum, such as wireless broadband."

Perhaps more surprisingly, the study concluded that pay-TV providers face few threats in regards to customers opting for internet or broadcast alternatives, with 76 percent of consumers reporting they were unlikely or very unlikely to cancel their pay-TV subscriptions.

Even so, the study highlights the importance of cable providers staying informed on the latest consumer trends in their industry.