Call centers aren't going anywhere - how to improve them

If businesses want to improve their customer satisfaction and loyalty, they might want to start with their call center.

If businesses want to improve their customer satisfaction and loyalty, they might want to start with their call center. Despite rumors that call centers could be fading in importance given increased consumer adoption of mobile devices, many companies will find that getting rid of it entirely is not financially feasible, according to Mashable.

Mashable conducted an analysis that broke down the cost comparison of using a mobile application for customer correspondence and keeping a call center. It found that in most cases, companies will spend more trying to optimize their service sites for a variety of devices than they would taking customers' calls. Perhaps more importantly, everybody can access a phone to contact the company, but consumers who don't own smartphones could be left in the dark if there isn't another way to reach the business.

Instead, companies can take steps to improve the systems they have in place. A good place to start is to see where they stand with clients. Onholdwith is a wesbite on Twitter where customers can log complaints about companies' call centers. Currently, brands generating the most tweets are the IRS, United Airlines, Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs and Apple.

Businesses that have long waits or poor call center reputations can improve the quality and maybe even speed of service when they engage and invest in their employees, according to Call Centre Helper. One company implemented strategies to make its staff feel comfortable, appreciated and heard so they could provide better service to customers.