Jobs and the tenets of customer experience management

The success of technology company Apple was no fluke. It combined marketing and business savvy with a focus on the end-user's experience.

The success of technology company Apple was no fluke. It combined marketing and business savvy with a focus on the end-user's experience. Through the dynamic leadership of the late - and great - Steve Jobs, Apple was adept at taking the extremely complex and making it simple and engaging.

In honor of the impact Jobs and his company have made, Greg Muller, a contributor to the Australian website Smart Company, compiled a list of the seven "Steve Jobs" laws of customer experience management.

First on his list was the advice to entrepreneurs and retailers to be passionate about their endeavors and products. Customers and employees are more likely to follow those with conviction and confidence, leading to greater industry esteem and more satisfied customers.

Secondly, whether a company is looking redesign its website, storefront or product, keep it simple. Furthermore, the design processing should be transparent and open. "Be boundary-less and remove the restrictive paradigms we place on ourselves. Get yourself into a frame where nothing is sacred … Use these as your new frame of reference and then work backwards to identify the steps to achieving it," Muller advised.

However, Jobs also warned about the perils of depending wholly on customer feedback. It needs to be a balanced process that requires knowing one's audience as well as backing oneself.

But don't swing wildly from idea to idea. Customers like to know what they can expect from a brand or retailer. And especially for a company like Apple, which follows the tenet of keeping it simple, consistency is a comfort.

"While many of us are generally willing to try something new, it's generally contingent on having a base level of comfort and knowledge," Muller wrote. "Jobs' ability to create this feel of sameness and 'family' over the years has created loyal, long-time customers who love talking about the product."

Lastly, consumers don't want to own a product, walk into a store or do business with a company that is trying to be everything to everyone. It can prove confusing and costly. As Muller explained, Jobs understood that it was important to do something and do it really well. No revisions necessary.