Radio and TV still top channels for discovering music

While the music and recording industries have suffered a notorious blow over the past decade as new digital alternatives rendered the traditional system of purchasing music virtually obsolete, demand has been anything but on the wane.

While the music and recording industries have suffered a notorious blow over the past decade as new digital alternatives rendered the traditional system of purchasing music virtually obsolete, demand has been anything but on the wane.

People are always going to love music. The problem the industry faces is in maintaining a lucrative market in which it can be exchanged. For that reason, analysts evaluate not necessarily how they consumers obtain new music, but how they find it.

According to a study released this week by the National Association of Recording Merchandisers and the NPD Group, more than 80 percent of music fans are interested in learning about new music through artists they are already fans of.

Internet radio as well as traditional AM/FM channels were noted as top methods of discovering new music, but television has emerged as the second-most influential tool for music discovery, the study found.

"On one hand you have fans who can't find enough ways to learn about new music, whether it's at retail, through apps and social networks, or on radio and TV," said Russ Crupnick, senior vice president of the NPD Group. "On the other hand there is still a large core group who learns by listening to AM/FM radio and on family shopping trips."