Eating healthy may be more expensive than many thought

It's a much-referenced complaint among consumers that they would like to eat more healthy, but it's just too expensive. Well, a new study published in the journal Health Affairs provides a factual basis for this concern.

It's a much-referenced complaint among consumers that they would like to eat more healthy, but it's just too expensive. Well, a new study published in the journal Health Affairs provides a factual basis for this concern.

U.S. nutritional guidelines may be economically unfeasible, as supporting a recommended diet rich in potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin D and calcium may end up costing the average American more than he or she can afford.

For example, the study pointed out that adding the suggested amount of potassium to a diet is likely to contribute an additional $380 per year to an average consumer's food budget, according to lead researcher Pablo Monsivais, an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington.

"We know that dietary guidelines aren't making a bit of difference in what we eat and our health overall," Monsivais told Reuters, adding that guidelines should be established to inform people of getting the most "bang for your buck."

"By putting the economic dimension on dietary guidelines," he said, "it would be very helpful for those on the economic margins, but also for everyone."