Sacrificing service in restaurants can cost servers tips

A recent study revealed that U.S. consumers do not feel so obligated to tip workers in the service industry that they are willing to overlook poor service.

A recent study revealed that U.S. consumers do not feel so obligated to tip workers in the service industry that they are willing to overlook poor service. As a reminder that high-quality customer service is extremely important to restaurants, 32 percent of surveyed adults said they have refused to leave a tip after they received less than average service, according to the poll by Harris Interactive on behalf of CouponCabin.

The study found that most patrons follow the 15 percent rule, while 51 percent say they tip 16 percent or more for average service. Others reported reducing the tip if they felt service was simply on par - 32 percent said they tip between 11 and 15 percent for average service and 13 percent said they tip 10 percent or less.

Since 62 percent of respondents said they felt inclined to leave a tip as a reward for hard work, restaurant workers may want to put extra emphasis on their customer service efforts. Some restaurants are working to improve customer satisfaction and loyalty by investing in new technology that could increase efficiency and productivity.

Chili's restaurants are installing touch screen kiosks that allow patrons to quickly order and pay their bill if they are in a hurry, according to WCCO news. The new technology has turned some families into regular customers because the smart machines keep kids entertained during meals.