In-store messaging can interfere with brand loyalty

Customers who make lists before they go shopping as a tool for staying on budget may still be susceptible to impulse purchases when they receive in-store messaging.

Customers who make lists before they go shopping as a tool for staying on budget may still be susceptible to impulse purchases when they receive in-store messaging. A study by The Integer Group found that 90 percent of shoppers buy items that were not on their lists.

When customers make lists before shopping, 61 percent say they are primarily influenced by the brand they currently use. Coupons influence lists for 57 percent of shoppers and 56 percent said they compile theirs after reading store ads. However, the research found that shoppers don't write down the brand names when they make their lists even though they have a choice in mind.

The study found that 66 percent of shoppers bought an item that wasn't on their list because it was on sale, 30 percent said they found a coupon for it and 23 percent said they wanted to pamper themselves.

Brands can improve customer satisfaction and loyalty with their products by creating an environment that fosters love between consumers and products, according to new research by the American Marketing Association's Journal of Marketing. When brands inspire loyal customers, they might be able to fight interference from in-store messaging.