Help brands keep their customer experiences up by mystery shopping

No one likes to have a bad customer experience. Going into a store, restaurant or hotel means people are expecting to be treated right and have their demands met.

No one likes to have a bad customer experience. Going into a store, restaurant or hotel means people are expecting to be treated right and have their demands met. This is part of why poor experiences are so disappointing, because it should not be hard to keep up with what is sensible, especially in a hotel situation. Becoming a mystery shopper allows individuals to help these companies meet their goals while getting paid for their time and insight. In other words, everybody wins.

Customer experience professional John Hendrie wrote on Hotel News Resource that mystery shopping helps organizations keep in touch with the common customer and procure valuable insights that may otherwise be lost. He spoke with experience professional Katie Chatfield, who told him that businesses must be cognizant of how the customer feels. This means there should be a point person that is running a mystery shopping and customer service program.

"In practice, you should [be] building experience around human needs and behaviors that can influence action," Hendrie wrote. "That defines how great brands build customer interaction and develop products."

What to look for and expectations of the company
As a mystery shopper, you may want to be seeing how much you are engaged by employees of the business you are reviewing. Customer service professional Dan Carter said brands will have content developed that will draw in customers, but the fight for their business will not be won here. Competent employees which put a positive face on the brand should be there. Mystery shoppers should keep track of how they were treated, which ways it can improve and how they felt about the overall experience with the business they were dealing with.

Inc. Magazine said mystery shoppers should have a clear direction from the organization of what to look for, which market research professional Ron Welty said will normally spawn from an issue or challenge the business is facing. One example is customer complaints, something that could certainly hurt the bottom line. Organizations should be looking at which areas of their business is being hit with the most complaints and send mystery shoppers to look at what is going wrong, what could be improved and any other challenges they see.

As a mystery shopper, you are giving companies a fresh set of eyes where they may not have previously had vision. This can take a business from transforming poor operations to excellent customer service, something that will help brands no matter the business model.